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Tag: horror literature

Episode 24: The Bell Tale Heart

 

Ranker: 15 Bizarre Facts About the Tragic Life of Edgar Allan Poe

the burial site of Edgar Allan Poe, 519 West Fayette Street, Baltimore, Maryland, USA: Westminster Hall and Burying Ground

E. A. Poe Society of Baltimore: Results of Tests on the Hair of Virginia and Edgar A. Poe: Arsenic, Lead, Mercury, Nickel, Uranium, & Vanadium

Saram Elmira Royster

Death of Edgar Allan Poe:

 

 

The Mystery of Edgar Allan Poe’s Death: 19 Theories on What Caused the Poet’s Demise

 

 

The Bells“, Edgar Allan Poe, courtesy of Bartleby.com

HEAR the sledges with the bells,
          Silver bells!
What a world of merriment their melody foretells!
    How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle,
        In the icy air of night!          5
    While the stars, that oversprinkle
    All the heavens, seem to twinkle
        With a crystalline delight;
      Keeping time, time, time,
      In a sort of Runic rhyme,   10
To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells
    From the bells, bells, bells, bells,
          Bells, bells, bells—
  From the jingling and the tinkling of the bells.
    Hear the mellow wedding bells,   15
          Golden bells!
What a world of happiness their harmony foretells!
    Through the balmy air of night
    How they ring out their delight!
      From the molten-golden notes,   20
          And all in tune,
      What a liquid ditty floats
  To the turtle-dove that listens, while she gloats
          On the moon!
      Oh, from out the sounding cells,   25
What a gush of euphony voluminously wells!
          How it swells!
          How it dwells
      On the Future! how it tells
      Of the rapture that impels   30
    To the swinging and the ringing
      Of the bells, bells, bells,
    Of the bells, bells, bells, bells,
          Bells, bells, bells—
  To the rhyming and the chiming of the bells!   35
    Hear the loud alarum bells,
          Brazen bells!
What a tale of terror, now, their turbulency tells!
    In the startled ear of night
    How they scream out their affright!   40
      Too much horrified to speak,
      They can only shriek, shriek,
          Out of tune,
In a clamorous appealing to the mercy of the fire,
In a mad expostulation with the deaf and frantic fire,   45
      Leaping higher, higher, higher,
      With a desperate desire,
    And a resolute endeavor
    Now—now to sit or never,
  By the side of the pale-faced moon.   50
      Oh, the bells, bells, bells!
      What a tale their terror tells
          Of Despair!
    How they clang, and clash, and roar!
    What a horror they outpour   55
On the bosom of the palpitating air!
      Yet the ear it fully knows,
          By the twanging
          And the clanging,
      How the danger ebbs and flows;   60
    Yet the ear distinctly tells,
          In the jangling
          And the wrangling,
    How the danger sinks and swells,—
By the sinking or the swelling in the anger of the bells,   65
          Of the bells,
    Of the bells, bells, bells, bells,
          Bells, bells, bells—
  In the clamor and the clangor of the bells!
    Hear the tolling of the bells,   70
          Iron bells!
What a world of solemn thought their monody compels!
    In the silence of the night
    How we shiver with affright
  At the melancholy menace of their tone!   75
    For every sound that floats
    From the rust within their throats
          Is a groan.
    And the people—ah, the people,
    They that dwell up in the steeple,   80
          All alone,
  And who tolling, tolling, tolling,
    In that muffled monotone,
  Feel a glory in so rolling
    On the human heart a stone—   85
They are neither man nor woman,
They are neither brute nor human,
      They are Ghouls:
  And their king it is who tolls;
  And he rolls, rolls, rolls,   90
        Rolls
    A pæan from the bells;
  And his merry bosom swells
    With the pæan of the bells,
  And he dances, and he yells:   95
  Keeping time, time, time,
  In a sort of Runic rhyme,
    To the pæan of the bells,
        Of the bells:
  Keeping time, time, time,  100
  In a sort of Runic rhyme,
  To the throbbing of the bells,
  Of the bells, bells, bells—
    To the sobbing of the bells;
  Keeping time, time, time,  105
    As he knells, knells, knells,
  In a happy Runic rhyme,
  To the rolling of the bells,
    Of the bells, bells, bells:
    To the tolling of the bells,  110
  Of the bells, bells, bells, bells,
        Bells, bells, bells—
To the moaning and the groaning of the bells.

 

There Might Be Cupcakes’ Goodreads bookshelf

 

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Book Review: Gosnell: The Untold Story of America’s Most Profilic Serial Killer

Gosnell: The Untold Story of America’s Most Prolific Serial Killer - Ann McElhinney, Phelim McAleer

This book is not for everyone. The authors are very honest about what Kermit Gosnell, and what Gosnell did went far beyond abortion. He murdered and decimated. If you are uncomfortable with Ed Gein’s story, do not read this book, for Gosnell was the same type of hoarder.

This book was finely investigated, so I only deduct one star for these reasons:
* the unnecessary, in my opinion, long chapter lecturing the reader on proper journalistic practices. It’s near the end of the book, so by the time it is reached, I as the reader have the full picture of the bizarre news dodge of this story. I don’t need a mini journalism class to drive it home.
* the occasional use of “pro-abortion” in place of “pro-choice” in general (the only person I have run across who is truly pro-abortion is Dr. Gosnell, for pro- implies enthusiasm, gusto); and, in companion with this, the introduction written by a member of the Duck Dynasty family. This case is so vile, it didn’t need to be politicized at all, in any way. Just tell the reader what Gosnell, his wife, and his staff did. You’ll probably change a lot of minds on abortion. I think these leans of bias make the annoyance of the lesson of the unbiased Fourth Estate stronger. To truly make this point, the book should have carried absolutely no agenda—including no biased language (a no-no in basic journalism) and no biased celebrity endorsement.

I can’t say this enough: this is an important case, and, despite its above flaws, an important book. But I am going to type a phrase below that was in the crime scene report about Ed Gein, and please let it be your litmus test for whether or not you should read this book.

That phrase is: cup of noses

Original post:
carla.booklikes.com/post/1610101/gosnell

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Episode 19: The King’s Eclipse

 

The King’s Eclipse: two works originally intended to be one, Gerald’s Game and Dolores Claiborne

 

A huge thank you to Bev Vincent, my King consultant for this episode. He is the authority on all things King, and I highly recommend every one of his books. Here’s his work on the King:

 

Quoted, cited, and referenced

Sun Moon Earth: The History of Solar Eclipses From Omens of Doom to Einstein and Exoplanets by Tyler Nordgren

Fifty Year Canon of Solar Eclipses  1986-2035 and Thousand Year Canon of Solar Eclipses 1591-2500 both by Fred Espanek, NASA astrophysicist

 

Shakespeare: King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra

Paradise Lost by John Milton

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain

 

In the Shadow of the Moon: The Science, Magic, and Mystery of Solar Eclipses by Anthony Aveni

 

The Waves by Virginia Woolf

 

A Treatise of Eclipses of the Sun and Moon 1715-1744 by Charles Leadbetter

 

All of the episode’s books have been added to the podcast’s Goodreads bookshelf.

Audible recommendation for your free book to keep, for trying one month of membership free (and supporting my podcast, thank you so very much!): click through audibletrial.com/mightbecupcakes, and choose either Dolores Claiborne, narrated by the wonderful character actor Frances Sternhagen, or Gerald’s Game, narrated by the equally strong Lindsay Crouse. You may also support me by purchasing them through Audible’s partner, Amazon, and again, I thank you:

 

 

Film versions

trailer for the film version of Dolores Claiborne

trailer for the film version of Gerald’s Game, now on Netflix:

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Episode 18: Yellow

“The Yellow-Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, one of the finest short stories written in the English language…hopefully done some justice as read by me.

 

Collected in:

 

Academic examination of:

Wild Unrest: Charlotte Perkins Gilman and the Making of “The Yellow Wall-Paper” by by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz

 

Quoted in the episode:

 

I escape, one way or another. No more walls.

—Anais Nin

 

All of the epsiode’s books have been added to the podcast’s Goodreads bookshelf.

 

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Episode 17: Wolves and Hoods

Stories read in this episode

“Le Petit Chaperon Rouge” by Charles Perrault: The Complete Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault

“Little Red-Cap” by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm (related to them by Jeannette and Marie Hassenpflug): The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm

“The True History of Little Golden Hood” by M. Charles Marelles, collected in Andrew Lang’s Red Fairy Book

Literature quoted in this episode

“The Company of Wolves” in The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories by Angela Carter (75th anniversary edition)

The Angel’s Game by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

Transformations by Anne Sexton (The Complete Poems)

The Wishing Spell by Chris Colfer

Suggested exploration of the Hood and Wolf in the movies

my favorite: Hard Candy

The Company of Wolves, based upon Angela Carter’s short story, above

Red Riding Hood (2011), with Amanda Seyfried, Gary Oldman

Trick R Treat-one of the many stories entwined in this anthology

Freeway (1996), with Kiefer Sutherland, Reese Witherspoon, and Amanda Plummer

Academic explorations

The Great Fairy Tale Tradition: From Straparola and Basile to the Brothers Grimm (Norton Critical Editions) by Jack Zipes
The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales by Bruno Bettelheim
The Classic Fairy Tales (Norton Critical Editions) by Marie Tatar

All books added to the podcast’s Goodreads bookshelf.

Agnes Grace Weld as Little Red Riding Hood, photographed by Lewis Carroll

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Episode 19 Teaser

Lovelies, I am sorry, but I am not going to be recording and publishing until tomorrow. I almost had a syncope (POTS fainting) episode today–luckily thwarted by last week’s ER doc’s medical advice, but even “almost” tears my body up.

But it’s going to be a good one, and since I am late, I will go ahead and spill:

It’s all about the eclipse, folklore about eclipses, and all tied into The Eclipse: The King Eclipse that empowered and psychically connected Jessie Burlingame (Gerald’s Game) and Dolores Clairborne.

To get you excited and tide you over, here’s the trailer for the amazing adaption of Dolores Claiborne, starring my friend in my head Kathy Bates and Jennifer Jason Leigh. Enjoy, and I will see you tomorrow.

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Episode 15: Old School Brownies

This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series Girl Scouting

The Scottish Brownie, from Scottish Fairy and Folk Tales, by George Douglas, 1901:

The Scottish Brownie formed a class of beings distinct in habit and disposition from the freakish and mischievous elves. He was meagre, shaggy, and wild in his appearance.

In the daytime he lurked in remote recesses of the old houses which he delighted to haunt; and in the night sedulously employed himself in discharging any laborious task which he thought might be acceptable to the family to whose service he had devoted himself. But the Brownie does not drudge from the hope of recompense. On the contrary, so delicate is his attachment that the offer of reward, but particularly of food, infallibly occasions his disappearance for ever.

Translation: leave the damn bowl of milk, honey, or porridge for your resident helpful household deity. Thank your brownie. Or…

It is told of a Brownie, who haunted a Border family now extinct, that the lady having fallen unexpectedly in labour, and the servant, who was ordered to ride to Jedburgh for the sage-femme, showing no great alertness in setting out, the familiar spirit slipt on the great-coat of the lingering domestic, rode to the town on the laird’s best horse, and returned with the midwife en croupe. During the short space of his absence, the Tweed, which they must necessarily ford, rose to a dangerous height. Brownie, who transported his charge with all rapidity, was not to be stopped by this obstacle. He plunged in with the terrified old lady, and landed her in safety where her services were wanted. Having put the horse into the stable (where it was afterwards found in a woful plight), he proceeded to the room of the servant whose duty he had discharged, and, finding him just in the act of drawing on his boots, administered to him a most merciless drubbing with his own horsewhip. Such an important service excited the gratitude of the laird, who, understanding that Brownie had been heard to express a wish to have a green coat, ordered a vestment of that colour to be made and left in his haunts. Brownie took away the green coat, but was never seen more. We may suppose that, tired of his domestic drudgery, he went in his new livery to join the fairies. (source)

He will beat your ass and leave, even if you say you’re sorry and make him a wee coat.

muffinsA sweeter sort, who won’t drub you with your own whip, look like cupcakes, and have veggie power to boot:

Sweet Potato Avocado Brownie Bites

  • sweet potato puree or pumpkin puree
  • avocado
  • eggs
  • honey
  • coconut oil
  • coconut flour
  • cocoa powder
  • baking soda
  • sea salt
  • mini chocolate chips
  • walnuts (optional)

24 mini muffins, gluten-free: Serving size: 1 mini-muffin Calories: 71 Fat: 4g Carbohydrates: 9g Sugar: 7g Sodium: 115mgFiber: 1g Protein: 1g

Hit the link for the full recipe. And make me some.

And, yes, in case you were wondering, the House Elves in the Harry Potter universe are based upon Brownies. God bless Dobby.

For those who were kids at the same time as I: there were two brownies in the movie Willow (1988), Franjean and Rool.

 

Recommended Reading

The Scottish Fairy Book by Elizabeth Grierson

The Lore of Scotland: A Guide to Scottish Legends by Jennifer Westwood and Sophia Kingshill

An Illustrated Treasury of Scottish Folk and Fairy Tales by Theresa Breslin

all added to the podcast’s bookshelf on Goodreads

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Episode 10: Boo Without Goo: Scary Movies For the Squeamish

Hecate: O! Well done! I commend your pains,

and ever one shall share i’ the gains…

Sec. Witch: By the pricking of my thumbs, something wicked this way comes.

Open, locks,

Whoever knocks!

Macbeth, Willam Shakespeare

Scary movies for the squeamish: the list of 31 films

  1. Paranormal Activity (2010)
  2. Paperhouse (1990), based upon the young adult novel Marianne Dreams, by Catherine Storr
  3. Lady in White (1988)
  4. The Changeling (1980), with the amazing George C. Scott
  5. What Lies Beneath (2000), with Harrison Ford and Michelle Pffiefer
  6. 1408 (2007), the first Stephen King on the list–original story from the collection Everything’s Eventual
  7. Storm of the Century (1999), and there’s the second Stephen King (screenplay)
  8. The Others (2001)
  9. Dark Water: both the original (2002), directed by Ringu and Ringu 2 director Hideo Nakata, and the American remake (2005) with Jennifer Connolly; based upon the short story Floating Water (浮遊する水; Fuyū Suru Mizu from the collection From the Depths of Dark Water Honogurai mizu no soko kara (Kanji: 仄暗い水の底から) by Koji Suzuki
  10. Rose Red (2002), lookee, Stephen King again
  11. The Haunting (1963), based upon Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House
  12. Skeleton Key (2005)
  13. The Ward (2010)
  14. Summer of Fear, sometimes also known as Stranger in Our House (1978), based upon the young adult novel by Lois Duncan
  15. The Ones Below (2015)
  16. It Follows (2014)
  17. Jessabelle (2014)—warning for one dead goat carcass shown
  18. The Caller (2011)
  19. Return to Oz (1985), based upon the second, third and fourth books in the Oz series: The Marvelous Land of Oz, Ozma of Oz, and Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz
  20. The Watcher in the Woods (1980)
  21. Emelie (2015)
  22. The Visit (2015)
  23. Rosemary’s Baby (1968), based upon the novel by Ira Levin
  24. The Blair Witch Project plus the short Curse of the Blair Witch (1999)
  25. Unfriended (2014)
  26. Something Wicked This Way Comes (1983), based upon the novel by Ray Bradbury
  27. The Good Son (1993), script written by novelist Ian McEwan, famous for Atonement
  28. The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992)
  29. The Houses October Built (2014)—this is a remake of the 2011 original by the same filmmakers, I have not seen the original. This is one of those movies that you will finish watching and swear it was gory. I promise you—no gore. None.
  30. One Hour Photo (2002)
  31. The Woman in Black (2012), based upon the novel by Susan Hill

bonus movie that I apparently inserted off the cuff during production: The Witch (2016)

All books added, as usual, to our bookshelf at Goodreads

 

Suggested book this week from Audible, my lovely sponsor:

Danse Macabre, by Stephen King, narrated by William Dufris. You can purchase it here, through Audible’s partner Amazon, or get it for free through my sponsor link from Audible, by signing up for a 30-day trial of Audible’s services. Either way, you are helping to support There Might Be Cupcakes, and I thank you heartily and humbly.

If you would like to purchase it in print, and still support me, you may do so by buying it through Amazon in either Kindle, hardcover, or paperback format, and thank you! I highly recommend it–it is my favorite book on the history of horror, what’s good about it (and what should be avoided)…and it reads like you’re having a beer and conversation with a good friend.

Fairuza Balk, Return to Oz (those are not podcast headphones)

From the list:

Addendums to Rose Red

not without goo:

book: The Diary of Ellen Rimbauer: My Life At Rose Red, and accompanying movie

Addendum to Something Wicked This Way Comes

the books:

series order:

  1. Dandelion Wine
  2. Something Wicked This Way Comes
  3. Farewell Summer
  4. Summer Morning, Summer Night

Addendum to Dark Water

the book tangents:

Koji Suzuki is also the author of the Ring novels:

  1. Ring
  2. Spiral
  3. Loop
  4. Birthday

Addendum to Rosemary’s Baby

The novel has a sequel: Son of Rosemary. If you cannot figure out the riddle given in a reasonable amount of time, hit me up.

My podcast recommendation this week: Faculty of Horror, Andrea Subissati and Alexandra West’s monthly graduate course on horror movies. Do your homework; here there be spoilers, and they grade on the curve of a knife.
Music used in this episode: “The Haunted Metronome”, by Pixyblink

 

Quoted in this episode (and not already mentioned)

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Episode 6: Let’s Go to the Movies

Part 1: the movie briefcase

Patton Oswalt‘s book: Silver Screen Fiend: Learning About Life From an Addiction to Film

The Godfather (1972) …also from a novel, naturally

Movies from my childhood in episode:
Star Wars (1977)
The Rescuers (1977) …also from a novel
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)
Pete’s Dragon (1977)
Superman II (1980)
Herbie marathon: The Love Bug (1968), Herbie Rides Again (1974), Herbie Goes Bananas (1980)

Part 2: found in translation

My books to movie list from this episode, in order:
Tie for 1. The Exorcist, The Silence of the Lambs, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe
4. The Dead Zone
5. Harriet the Spy
6. Frankenstein
7. Little Women
8. Hamlet
9. Interview with the Vampire
10. Dracula
special mention. Bridge to Terabithia

…and their best adaption to film, in my opinion (if given a choice):

 

…and don’t forget Scream (your girl’s been making it rain popcorn since 1996) and A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984 original) (bound in a nutshell and made a king of infinite space)

 

 

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